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About USD 150 million is awarded by the US to replace and repair EV charging points

There are more than 170,000 public charging ports in the US, and the White House said that since the Biden administration began, there have been more than 70% more public chargers.
Reuters
 

On Thursday, the U.S. Department of Transportation announced that it will be providing $148.8 million to projects in 20 states aimed at replacing or repairing the approximately 4,500 current electric car charging points.


As President Joe Biden's administration works to complete new regulations in the upcoming months that might significantly increase EV sales, this announcement is the most recent in a series of grants to support EV charging.



The money, according to Federal Highway Administrator Shailen Bhatt in a Reuters interview, are intended to assist disgruntled owners who discover their EV chargers aren't working.

Citing increasing sales of electric vehicles, Bhatt stated, "We know there's going to be more demand for the technology," adding that charging is improving. "We anticipate reliability being less of an issue going forward."


The additional funding is a component of the USD 1 trillion 2021 infrastructure law-funded USD 5 billion National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (NEVI) initiative. State-funded charging stations must function 97% of the time for a minimum of five years in order to be eligible for program funding.


The White House wants to see 500,000 chargers across the country by 2030, with high-speed charges located on the major routes and interstates, no more than 50 miles (80 km) apart.


Even as more manufacturers are using Tesla's EV charging technology, industry observers argue that significantly increasing the number of EV charging stations is essential to the widespread adoption of electric vehicles.


There are more than 170,000 public charging ports in the US, and the White House said that since the Biden administration began, there have been more than 70% more public chargers.

In 2021, with the support of automakers, Biden announced a target to have 50% of new cars be electric or plug-in hybrids by 2030.


The government is anticipated to approve new emissions restrictions by March. The Environmental Protection Agency has proposed strict new tailpipe standards that will result in 67% of new vehicles being electrified by 2032.


In response to automakers' requests, Republicans in the US House of Representatives voted last month to prevent the EPA from implementing these regulations.



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